When you love someone, you see yourself as the best you’ll ever be through their eyes. You see yourself as the strongest, as the prettiest, or the most handsome, you know. The person believes in you so much, you believe in yourself. And that’s why you feel like you’re leaving a part of yourself when you leave that person. Because technically, you are. You’re leaving what you see yourself as. Trick is to love yourself someday, so much, that you actually don’t need someone else to justify what you are, who you are, but someone who complements who you are. Someone that’s willing to grow with you.

Immortal Technique (via kevinidentity)

(Source: insaniyat)

Your soul is oftentimes a battlefield, upon which your reason and your judgement wage war against your passion and your appetite.

Khalil Gibran  (via keepingtaqwa)

(Source: aliofbabylon)

People will love you, people will hate you, and none of it will have anything to do with you.

Abraham Hicks (via elige)

(Source: elige)

Mom's wisdom on falling in love and marrying the right person:

  • (I remember this because I made a point of writing each word down in my diary when she said this to me. I thought I'd share it with you lovely people out there.)

  • Mom:

    You're growing up, and sometimes it hurts. Because there are responsibilities, expectations, plans gone wrong, confusion, angst, little understanding. And then there's love.

  • Her:

    Mohabbat karna burri baat nahi hai. (Falling in love is not a bad thing.)

  • Her:

    You'll fall in love with the wrong guy, you'll fall in love with the right guy. You'll learn lessons from both. Marry the one you feel easy with. The one who doesn't make you want to evaluate every angle of yours, the way you talk, the way you walk, how you look like, what kind of politics you enjoy. He should love you for you. Even if he's a thousand miles away. He better try to come close to you, to keep you. He should be able to hold you tightly when you cry and to push you forward when you act like a pathetic, self-loathing goofball. He should know your worth is a lot more than you already think it is but insist humility and grace. He should be your friend and secret keeper. And he'll hurt you, everyone hurts someone they love, and you better forgive him at least once. The right guy won't lie to you, he won't promise you nothings, he'll make stupid mistakes but he'll try to fix them. Love him for trying. Marry him and tell him you don't care if he's not the richest man in the world as long as he's making a decent income to bring food to the table, a good lock on the door. Encourage him, be honest to him, never ever let him make you insignificant because you're a woman. Let him know you can fight too. A good man won't ever take you for granted. He'll respect your choice and make space for them.

  • Her:

    Just make sure he's taller than you.

  • Her:

    What? Don't look at me funny?

You know, sometimes you just have to let shit go or it will fuck up your future.

Brace

All the preconceived notions that I had, what should’ve been, could’ve been, what I expected… that’s not real. Nobody has to perform the way you think. You just have to be okay with it.

Jay
thepoliticalnotebook:

This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

Read more at the New York Times. 
(Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

Read more at the New York Times

(Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

Don’t take advantage of someone, thinking that they’ll always be there for you.

(via lambanajib)

Stop.

Stop seeking fights like you don’t have enough enemies in this world.

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